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posts from 2017

XAML Storyboard.IsPlaying Attached Property

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By Fons Sonnemans, 24-2-2017

XAML is very powerful. I have blogged about behaviors a lot. They are great but also have limitations. You can only drag them on Controls, not on Storyboards. To "fix" this I came up with a solution using Attached Properties. The designer support isn't as good with Behaviors but who needs that if we have IntelliSense.

IsPlaying Attached Property

I have created a StoryboardServices class which contains the IsPlaying attached property of the type boolean. In the OnIsPlayingChanged() method I Begin() or Resume() the Storyboard if it is set to True, I Pause() it when it is set to False.

using System;
using Windows.UI.Xaml;
using Windows.UI.Xaml.Media.Animation;

namespace AnimationDemo {
    public class StoryboardServices {

        #region IsPlaying Attached Property

        /// <summary> 
        /// Identifies the IsPlaying attachted property. This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
        /// </summary>
        public static readonly DependencyProperty IsPlayingProperty =
            DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("IsPlaying",
                typeof(bool),
                typeof(StoryboardServices),
                new PropertyMetadata(false, OnIsPlayingChanged));

        /// <summary>
        /// IsPlaying changed handler. 
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="d">FrameworkElement that changed its IsPlaying attached property.</param>
        /// <param name="e">DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs with the new and old value.</param> 
        private static void OnIsPlayingChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e) {
            var source = d as Storyboard;
            if (source != null) {
                var value = (bool)e.NewValue;
                if (value) {
                    if (source.GetCurrentState() == ClockState.Stopped) {
                        source.Begin();
                    } else {
                        source.Resume();
                    }
                } else {
                    source.Pause();
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the value of the IsPlaying attached property from the specified FrameworkElement.
        /// </summary>
        public static bool GetIsPlaying(DependencyObject obj) {
            return (bool)obj.GetValue(IsPlayingProperty);
        }


        /// <summary>
        /// Sets the value of the IsPlaying attached property to the specified FrameworkElement.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="obj">The object on which to set the IsPlaying attached property.</param>
        /// <param name="value">The property value to set.</param>
        public static void SetIsPlaying(DependencyObject obj, bool value) {
            obj.SetValue(IsPlayingProperty, value);
        }

        #endregion IsPlaying Attached Property

    }
}

Example

In this example I have a Storyboard1 which plays when the checkbox on the page is checked. I databound the IsPlaying attached property to the IsChecked property of the checkbox (see line 10). The animation is really simple but you get the idea.

<Page x:Class="AnimationDemo.MainPage"
      xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
      xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
      xmlns:local="using:AnimationDemo"
      xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
      xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
      mc:Ignorable="d">
    <Page.Resources>
        <Storyboard x:Name="Storyboard1"
             local:StoryboardServices.IsPlaying="{Binding IsChecked, ElementName=checkBoxIsAnimated, Mode=OneWay}"
             RepeatBehavior="Forever">
            <ColorAnimationUsingKeyFrames
                    Storyboard.TargetProperty="(Border.Background).(SolidColorBrush.Color)"
                   Storyboard.TargetName="myBorder">
                <EasingColorKeyFrame KeyTime="0:0:1"
                                     Value="Blue" />
                <EasingColorKeyFrame KeyTime="0:0:2"
                                     Value="Red" />
            </ColorAnimationUsingKeyFrames>
        </Storyboard>
    </Page.Resources>

    <Grid Background="{ThemeResource ApplicationPageBackgroundThemeBrush}">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="1*" />
            <ColumnDefinition Width="2*" />
            <ColumnDefinition Width="1*" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

        <CheckBox x:Name="checkBoxIsAnimated"
                  Content="Animate"
                  IsChecked="True"
                  VerticalAlignment="Top"
                  HorizontalAlignment="Center"
                  Grid.Column="1" />

        <Border x:Name="myBorder"
                Height="100"
                Grid.Column="1"
                Background="Red" />
    </Grid>
</Page>

The code

I have published my code on GitHub. I hope you like it.

Fons

XAML ScrollSelectedItemIntoViewBehavior

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By Fons Sonnemans, 12-1-2017

I love C#, XAML and Blend. It is very powerful and lets me create powerful solutions. As a example of it's power I will demonstrate my ScrollSelectedItemIntoViewBehavior. It will let you scroll to a selected item into view of a ListView or GridView without having to write any code.

Demo

The following video (GIF) shows you how you can use it to scroll to the selected product into view of a ListView. This can be done animated or instant.

ScrollSelectedItemIntoViewBehavior Demo

My Solution

My solution is a Behavior which you can apply on any ListView or GridView using Blend for Visual Studio. I have included the Microsoft.Xaml.Behaviors.Uwp.Managed NuGet package to the project. The ScrollSelectedItemIntoViewBehavior class derives from the Behavior<T> class (from the NuGet package) in which T is a ListViewBase. This allows me to use (drop) the behavior on a ListView or GridView. In the OnAttached() and OnDetached() methods I subscribe/unsubscribe to the SelectionChanged event of the AssociatedObject, the ListView or GridView. In the AssociatedObject_SelectionChanged() method the AssociatedObject scrolls to the selected item. For the scrolling I use some code (extension methods) I found on StackOverflow which does the hard work. I only changed some naming of the methods to follow my own code conventions.

public class ScrollSelectedItemIntoViewBehavior : Behavior<ListViewBase> {

    protected override void OnAttached() {
        AssociatedObject.SelectionChanged += AssociatedObject_SelectionChanged;
        base.OnAttached();
    }
    protected override void OnDetaching() {
        AssociatedObject.SelectionChanged -= AssociatedObject_SelectionChanged;
        base.OnDetaching();
    }

    private async void AssociatedObject_SelectionChanged(object sender, 
                                                    SelectionChangedEventArgs e) {
        var item = e.AddedItems.FirstOrDefault();
        if (item != null) {
            if (IsScrollAnimated) {
                await this.AssociatedObject.ScrollToItemAsync(item);
            } else {
                await this.AssociatedObject.ScrollIntoViewAsync(item);
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary> 
    /// Get or Sets the IsScrollAnimated dependency property.  
    /// </summary> 
    public bool IsScrollAnimated {
        get { return (bool)GetValue(IsScrollAnimatedProperty); }
        set { SetValue(IsScrollAnimatedProperty, value); }
    }

    /// <summary> 
    /// Identifies the IsScrollAnimated dependency property. 
    /// This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    /// </summary> 
    public static readonly DependencyProperty IsScrollAnimatedProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register(nameof(IsScrollAnimated),
                            typeof(bool),
                            typeof(ScrollSelectedItemIntoViewBehavior),
                            new PropertyMetadata(true));
}

 

Using the Behavior

My sample project also contains some SampleData (products) which I used to populate a ListView. I have dragged the ScrollSelectedItemIntoViewBehavior from the Assets panel and dropped it on the ListView. The behavior also contains an IsScrollAnimated dependency property. The ToggleSwitch is databound to this property.

<Page xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
      xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
      xmlns:local="using:App47"
      xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
      xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
      xmlns:Interactivity="using:Microsoft.Xaml.Interactivity"
      xmlns:Behaviors="using:App47.Behaviors"
      x:Class="App47.MainPage"
      mc:Ignorable="d">

    <Page.Resources>
        <DataTemplate x:Key="ProductTemplate">
            <Grid Height="80"
                  Margin="0,4">
                <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
                    <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto" />
                    <ColumnDefinition Width="*" />
                </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
                <Image Source="{Binding ImageUrl}"
                       Height="80"
                       Width="80" />
                <StackPanel Grid.Column="1"
                            Margin="8,0,0,0">
                    <TextBlock Text="{Binding Name}"
                               Style="{StaticResource TitleTextBlockStyle}" />
                    <TextBlock Text="{Binding Price}"
                               Style="{StaticResource CaptionTextBlockStyle}"
                               TextWrapping="NoWrap" />
                </StackPanel>
            </Grid>
        </DataTemplate>
    </Page.Resources>

    <Grid Background="{ThemeResource ApplicationPageBackgroundThemeBrush}"
          DataContext="{Binding Source={StaticResource SampleDataSource}}">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="380*" />
            <ColumnDefinition Width="1541*" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <StackPanel>
            <Button Content="First"
                    Click="ButtonFirst_Click"
                    HorizontalAlignment="Stretch"
                    VerticalAlignment="Stretch"
                    Margin="4" />
            <Button Content="Middle"
                    Click="ButtonMiddle_Click"
                    HorizontalAlignment="Stretch"
                    VerticalAlignment="Stretch"
                    Margin="4" />
            <Button Content="Last"
                    Click="ButtonLast_Click"
                    HorizontalAlignment="Stretch"
                    VerticalAlignment="Stretch"
                    Margin="4" />
            <ToggleSwitch Header="IsAnimated"
                          Margin="4"
                          IsOn="{x:Bind myBehavior.IsScrollAnimated, Mode=TwoWay}" />
        </StackPanel>
        <ListView x:Name="listViewProducts"
                  Grid.Column="1"
                  ItemTemplate="{StaticResource ProductTemplate}"
                  ItemsSource="{Binding Products}">
            <Interactivity:Interaction.Behaviors>
                <Behaviors:ScrollSelectedItemIntoViewBehavior x:Name="myBehavior" />
            </Interactivity:Interaction.Behaviors>
        </ListView>
    </Grid>
</Page>

The buttons click eventhandlers only set the SelectedIndex of the ListView. An MVVM solution in which the SelectedIndex is databound to a property of a model would also work.

public sealed partial class MainPage : Page {

    public MainPage() {
        this.InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void ButtonFirst_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
        listViewProducts.SelectedIndex = 0;
    }

    private void ButtonMiddle_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
        listViewProducts.SelectedIndex = (listViewProducts.Items.Count - 1) / 2;
    }

    private void ButtonLast_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
        listViewProducts.SelectedIndex = listViewProducts.Items.Count - 1;

    }
}

The code

I have published my code on GitHub. I hope you like it.

Fons

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