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Windows 8 XAML Tips - Settings Demo

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By Fons Sonnemans, 10-8-2012

In my previous blog post I explained how you can use the PaneThemeTransition from the Animation Library to show a task pane. In this blog post I want to use this technique to open my Settings and About task panes from the Settings Charm. I will try to make it easier by introducing a TaskPanePopup helper class.

TaskPanePopup

You construct an instance of the TaskPanePopup class using a task pane, in most cases this will be a user control. In the constructor a Popup control is created and initialized with the Child (the task pane) and the ChildTransitions (PaneThemeTransition coming from the right). The Width of the task pane must be set to calculate the position of the Popup. The task pane will be shown in a Popup using the animation when you call the Show() method on the instance.

public class TaskPanePopup {

    private Popup _popup;
    public FrameworkElement TaskPane { get; private set; }

    public TaskPanePopup(FrameworkElement taskPane) {
        if (double.IsNaN(taskPane.Width)) {
            throw new ArgumentException("TaskPane width must be set");
        }
        this.TaskPane = taskPane;

        this._popup = new Popup {
            IsLightDismissEnabled = true,
            ChildTransitions = new TransitionCollection(),
            Child = taskPane,
        };

        this._popup.ChildTransitions.Add(new PaneThemeTransition {
            Edge = EdgeTransitionLocation.Right
        });
    }

    public void Show() {
        this.TaskPane.Height = Window.Current.Bounds.Height;
        this._popup.SetValue(
                Canvas.LeftProperty,
                Window.Current.Bounds.Width - this.TaskPane.Width
        );
        this._popup.IsOpen = true;
    }

}

Settings Charm

To demonstrate the use of my class I have created a sample appliation. This app must have a Settings and About command in the Settings Charm. Therefore I have subscribed the app on the CommandsRequested event of the current SettingsPane (line 30). In the event handler I have created two SettingsCommand objects and added them to the ApplicationCommands. These Commands create the TaskPanePopup objects in their handlers and shows them.

sealed partial class App : Application
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes the singleton Application object.  This is the first line of authored code
    /// executed, and as such is the logical equivalent of main() or WinMain().
    /// </summary>
    public App()
    {
        this.InitializeComponent();
        this.Suspending += OnSuspending;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Invoked when the application is launched normally by the end user.  Other entry points
    /// will be used when the application is launched to open a specific file, to display
    /// search results, and so forth.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="args">Details about the launch request and process.</param>
    protected override async void OnLaunched(LaunchActivatedEventArgs args)
    {
        // Do not repeat app initialization when already running, just ensure that
        // the window is active
        if (args.PreviousExecutionState == ApplicationExecutionState.Running)
        {
            Window.Current.Activate();
            return;
        }

        // Init SettingsPane
        SettingsPane.GetForCurrentView().CommandsRequested += App_CommandsRequested;

        // Create a Frame to act as the navigation context and associate it with
        // a SuspensionManager key
        var rootFrame = new Frame();
        SuspensionManager.RegisterFrame(rootFrame, "AppFrame");

        if (args.PreviousExecutionState == ApplicationExecutionState.Terminated)
        {
            // Restore the saved session state only when appropriate
            await SuspensionManager.RestoreAsync();
        }

        if (rootFrame.Content == null)
        {
            // When the navigation stack isn't restored navigate to the first page,
            // configuring the new page by passing required information as a navigation
            // parameter
            if (!rootFrame.Navigate(typeof(GroupedItemsPage), "AllGroups"))
            {
                throw new Exception("Failed to create initial page");
            }
        }

        // Place the frame in the current Window and ensure that it is active
        Window.Current.Content = rootFrame;
        Window.Current.Activate();
    }

    private TaskPanePopup _settings;
    private TaskPanePopup _about;

    private void App_CommandsRequested(SettingsPane sender,
                                       SettingsPaneCommandsRequestedEventArgs args) {
            
        SettingsCommand cmd = new SettingsCommand("Settings", "Settings", (command) => {
            if (_settings == null) {
                _settings = new TaskPanePopup(new SettingsControl());
            }
            _settings.Show();
        });

        args.Request.ApplicationCommands.Add(cmd);

        cmd = new SettingsCommand("About", "About", (command) => {
            if (_about == null) {
                _about = new TaskPanePopup(new AboutControl());
            }
            _about.Show();
        });

        args.Request.ApplicationCommands.Add(cmd);
    }

If you start the application and open the Settings Charm (WinKey-I) you will get the following Settings Charm.

If you select the Settings command the SettingsControl will popup using the correct animation.

Task Pane User Control

A task pane is in my case a User Control with a back button, title and content. This content is shown using an EntranceThemeTransition from the Animation Library. This will bring this app to life.

XAML of my SettingsControl user control

<UserControl
    x:Class="SettingsDemo.SettingsControl"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="using:SettingsDemo"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
    mc:Ignorable="d"
    d:DesignHeight="768"
    Width="350">

    <Grid
        Background="Crimson">
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition
                Width="45" />
            <ColumnDefinition />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition
                Height="100" />
            <RowDefinition />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <Grid
            VerticalAlignment="Bottom"
            Grid.Column="1">
            <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
                <ColumnDefinition
                    Width="Auto" />
                <ColumnDefinition />
            </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <Button
                Click="ButtonBack_Click"
                HorizontalAlignment="Stretch"
                Margin="0"
                Style="{StaticResource SnappedBackButtonStyle}"
                VerticalAlignment="Bottom" />
            <TextBlock
                Text="Settings"
                Grid.Column="1"
                VerticalAlignment="Top"
                Style="{StaticResource SubheaderTextStyle}"
                FontFamily="Segoe UI Semibold" />
        </Grid>
        <StackPanel
            Grid.Row="1"
            Grid.Column="1">
            <StackPanel.ChildrenTransitions>
                <TransitionCollection>
                    <EntranceThemeTransition
                        FromHorizontalOffset="100" />
                </TransitionCollection>
            </StackPanel.ChildrenTransitions>
            <TextBlock
                TextWrapping="Wrap"
                Text="Place your content here"
                Style="{StaticResource BasicTextStyle}" />
        </StackPanel>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

C# code behind of my SettingsControl user control

public sealed partial class SettingsControl : UserControl {

    public SettingsControl() {
        this.InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void ButtonBack_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
        var popup = this.Parent as Popup;
        if (popup != null) popup.IsOpen = false;
        SettingsPane.Show(); 
    } 
}

Closure

I hope you like my solution. You can download my code below.

Cheers,

Fons

Windows 8 XAML Tips - Show a task pane

1 Comments
By Fons Sonnemans, 25-6-2012

You can integrate the look and feel introduced in Windows 8 Release Preview into your Metro style app by using the Animation Library suite of Windows-provided animations. Use of the Animation Library animations provides these benefits:

  • Motions that align to Metro style animation principles
  • Fast, fluid transitions between UI states that inform but do not distract the user
  • Clearer visuals to show the user transitions within an app

One of the animations that are supplied in the Animation Library is the show hide panel animation. You use it to show and hide a panel, which is large edge-based UI such as a custom keyboard or a task pane. This 'Windows Animation (Metro styled apps)' article shows you how you can use the PaneThemeTransition animation class in XAML. The article also contains the video below in which the animation is shown. Sadly there is no code sample how to use it in your XAML/C# application. With this blog I want to fill in the gap. I will explain you how you get the animation as shown in the video.

Show a task pane video

If you play this video you will see a task plane appear from the right side of the screen.

My Solution

In my solution I have a page with only one button. If you click this button a red Rectangle will appear from the right side of the screen. You can off course replace this Rectangle with your own User Control.

I use a Popup control to show my red Rectangle with a with of 300 pixels. The Child property of the Popup is set to the Rectangle. The Popup has a ChildTransitions which is filled with a PaneThemeTransition animation object. The PaneThemeTransition object has a Edge property set to the Right. The left position of the Popup is calculated using the actual width of the page minus the width of the rectangle. This position and the height of the Rectangle are set every time the pane is shown because it can differ due to view changes (filled, landscape, portrait).

public sealed partial class MainPage : Page {

    private Popup _popup;

    public MainPage() {
        this.InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void ButtonShow_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
        ShowTaskPane();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Show and hide a task pane or other large UI container from the edge of the screen.
    /// http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-US/library/windows/apps/hh975420
    /// </summary>
    private void ShowTaskPane() {
        const int width = 300;

        if (_popup == null) {

            var rect = new Rectangle {
                Fill = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Red),
                Width = width,
            };

            _popup = new Popup {
                IsLightDismissEnabled = true,
                ChildTransitions = new TransitionCollection(),
                Child = rect,
            };

            _popup.ChildTransitions.Add(new PaneThemeTransition 
                                        { Edge = EdgeTransitionLocation.Right });
        }

        (_popup.Child as FrameworkElement).Height = this.ActualHeight;
        _popup.SetValue(Canvas.LeftProperty, this.ActualWidth - width);
        _popup.IsOpen = true;
    }
}

Closure

I hope you like my solution. I my next blog I will try to create a more generic one. I will then use it to show task panes from the Settings charm.

Cheers,

Fons

Windows 8 XAML Tips – Custom Fonts

1 Comments
By Fons Sonnemans, 12-6-2012

It is time for me to write a series of blog items on writing XAML applications for Windows 8. I plan to write one every two weeks. I hope I can keep up the promise.

Custom Fonts

I have developed XAML applications in Silverlight (Browser and Phone) for a couple of years. I used custom fonts in those Apps using Expression Blend. It contains a Font Manager which you can use to embed a font into the application (project/assembly). Blend for Visual Studio doesn’t allow you to use the Font Manager. The menu option is disabled in this Release Candidate. I hope to get it back in a future version.

The default FontFamily in a Metro app is ‘Segoe UI’ which is called ‘Global User Interface’ in Blend. You can of course use Blend or Visual Studio to select another FontFamily. But if your user doesn’t have this font installed you will get the default font. That’s why you will have to add the font to the application.

Luckily it is possible to add it to the application manually. For this demo I will be using a free true type font called 123Sketch which I downloaded here: http://www.dafont.com/123sketch.font. First I created a new folder in my project named ‘Fonts’. I added my font file to this folder. The Build Action for the file is set to ‘Content’ which is required.

123Sketch.ttf added to the Fonts folder

You reference the font file and font name in your XAML using the following format:
FontFamily="/<path to font file>/<font file>#<font name>"

So in my case a TextBlock would be defined like this.

<TextBlock
    Text="Hello World"
    FontSize="45"
    FontFamily="/Fonts/123Sketch.ttf#123Sketch" />

FontFamily Resource

It is smart to create a Resource for this FontFamily property. This will make it easier for you if you want to change the font for another one. In Blend you can convert the FontFamily by clicking on the white square next to the dropdown.

Convert FontFamily to New Resource

You will get a dialog in which you can set the name (key) of the resource and the location where it will be defined. In this demo I named it ‘MyCustomFont’ and defined it in ‘This Document’. Choosing the ‘Application’ or a ‘Resource Dictionary’ would make this resource reusable in other documents.

Create FontFamily Resource

You can now use the resource for the FontFamily property in other elements. Just pick it from the ‘Local Resource’.

Assign Local Resource

Result

The XAML of the Page including the static resource and two TextBlock elements would look like this.

<Page
    x:Class="FontDemo.MainPage"
    IsTabStop="false"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="using:FontDemo"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
    mc:Ignorable="d">

    <Page.Resources>
        <!-- TODO: Move the next line to App.xaml or a ResourceDictionary -->
        <FontFamily            
            x:Key="MyCustomFont">/Fonts/123Sketch.ttf#123Sketch</FontFamily>
    </Page.Resources>

    <Grid
        Background="{StaticResource ApplicationPageBackgroundThemeBrush}">

        <TextBlock
            HorizontalAlignment="Left"
            Margin="65,48,0,0"
            TextWrapping="Wrap"
            Text="Hello"
            VerticalAlignment="Top"
            FontSize="45"
            FontFamily="{StaticResource MyCustomFont}" />

        <TextBlock
            HorizontalAlignment="Left"
            Margin="65,118,0,0"
            TextWrapping="Wrap"
            Text="World"
            VerticalAlignment="Top"
            FontSize="45"
            FontFamily="{StaticResource MyCustomFont}" />

    </Grid>
</Page>

If you start the application in the Simulator you get this result.

Simulator showing the result

I hope this helps you. Fonts often are copyright protected. So if you want to add one make sure you have the rights or use a free one.

Cheers,

Fons

'Sudoku Free' eerste Nederlandse Windows 8 app

1 Comments
By Fons Sonnemans, 7-6-2012

Sudoku Free is het de eerste Nederlandse applicatie in de Windows 8 Store. Het spel is gebaseerd op de Windows Phone Sudoku app die in oktober 2010 in de Marketplace verscheen. Overigens ook als eerste Nederlandse app.

Bij de Windows 8 app heeft Flavour mij geholpen met de grafische vormgeving. Bij het ombouwen heb ik een hergebruik van 90% van de code gerealiseerd. De schermen (XAML) zijn door de grotere schermformaten redelijk veel gewijzigd.

In deze eerste week is de app al ruim 10.000 keer gedownload. De reviews zijn zeer positief. Ik ben dan ook van plan om diverse van mijn WP7 apps om te bouwen naar Windows 8.

Omschrijving

Speel standaard 9x9 Sudoku puzzels. Train en versterk uw hersenen in visueel scannen. Met drie moeilijkheidsgradaties, intuïtieve metro-stijl interface, en alle functies binnen handbereik, is dit Sudoku spel is zeker snel uw favoriet.

Mogelijkheden

    • 3 verschillende moeilijkheidsgradaties (eenvoudig, normaal, moeilijk)
    • willekeurige puzzel generator zodat u altijd een andere puzzel krijgt
    • automatisch opslaan (roaming)
    • ondersteunt touch, muis en toetsenbord
    • ongedaan maken, opnieuw en notities
    • valideren, hint, oplossen
    • Nederlands of Engels

    Download

    Als u de Windows 8 Release Preview geïnstalleerd heeft kunt u het spel nu al downloaden door op de onderstaande afbeelding te klikken.

    Screenshots

    Hoofdvenster Start van een normale puzzel Bij het oplossen kunt u gebruik maken van notities Controleer de puzzel vanuit de applicatiebalk Sudoku instellingen Puzzle opgelost Windows Store

    Groeten,

    Fons

    Tags: Windows 8, Apps

    Windows 8 DevCamp sessies

    0 Comments
    By Fons Sonnemans, 26-4-2012

    Op 12 en 13 april 2012 heeft Microsoft Nederland in de Fabrique in Maarssen het Windows 8 Developer & User Experience Design Camp georganiseerd. Het was een druk bezocht evenement waarbij er een bijna 50/50 mix was van developers en designers.

    De eerste dag bestond uit een programma van sessies, waarbij er ook breakouts waren voor developers en voor designers. Hiervan heb ik 2 sessies mogen verzorgen. Deze sessies zijn opgenomen en staan nu online op Channel9.

    Het bouwen van een Metro style app

    Deze sessie laat zien hoe met XAML, C# en WinRT een Metro style applicatie voor Windows 8 gebouwd kan worden. Er wordt getoond wat de veranderingen en toevoegingen zijn in Windows 8. Denk hierbij aan asynchroon programmeren en andere technieken die de kwaliteit van Metro style apps zullen verhogen.

    Laat je Metro style app leven door tiles en notificaties

    Gebruikers worden als het ware naar een app toegetrokken door het gebruik van actieve tiles op het start scherm. Notificaties die door de Windows Push Notification Service verstuurd kunnen worden, kunnen gebruikers weer de aandacht vestigen op een app zonder dat die actief is. In deze sessie wordt verteld hoe tiles en notificaties gebruikt kunnen worden. Er wordt ook geleerd hoe een tile een deep link naar specifieke informatie in een app kan verzorgen

    Overige sessies

    Cheers,

    Fons

    MessageBox.Show() in WinRT

    6 Comments
    By Fons Sonnemans, 12-3-2012

    I'm currently in the process of converting some of my Windows Phone apps to the Windows 8 Consumer Preview. While doing so I discovered there is no MessageBox.Show() method in WinRT. The alternative is to use the new MessageDialog class. This means I have to rewrite a lot of code which I try to avoid. Therefore I came up with my own MessageBox helper class which mimics the behavior of the WP7 MessageBox. In this post I will demonstrate this, using the following sample application.

    Suppose I have the following code in my Windows Phone application:

    private void Button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
        var result = MessageBox.Show("This is MessageBox", "Title", MessageBoxButton.OKCancel);
        if (result == MessageBoxResult.OK) {
            // do something    
        }
        Button1.Content = result.ToString();
    }
    

    In Windows 8 I would have to rewrite it to the following:

    private async void Button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
        MessageDialog md = new MessageDialog("This is a MessageDialog", "Title");
        bool? result = null;
        md.Commands.Add(
           new UICommand("OK", new UICommandInvokedHandler((cmd) => result = true)));
        md.Commands.Add(
           new UICommand("Cancel", new UICommandInvokedHandler((cmd) => result = false)));
    
        await md.ShowAsync();
        if (result == true) {
            // do something    
        }
        Button1.Content = result.ToString();
    }
    

    As you can see I have marked the Button1_Click() method with the async keyword. This is necessary because the ShowAsync() method is called, using the new await keyword. The MessageDialog is shown in an seperate thread which will allow the main thread to continue to execute. This allows all animations running on the main thread to continue to play.

    My MessageBox show helper class makes my conversion much easier. You only have to change the Show() call to a ShowAsync() call and add the await and async keywords.

    private async void Button2_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
        var result = await MessageBox.ShowAsync("This is a MessageBox", 
                                                "Title", MessageBoxButton.OKCancel);
        if (result == MessageBoxResult.OK) {
            // do something    
        }
        Button2.Content = result.ToString();
    }
    

    Here is the code of my MessageBox helper class:

    using System;
    using System.Threading.Tasks;
    using Windows.UI.Popups;
    
    namespace ReflectionIT.Windows8.Helpers {
    
        class MessageBox {
    
            public static async Task<MessageBoxResult> ShowAsync(string messageBoxText, 
                                                                 string caption, 
                                                                 MessageBoxButton button) {
    
                MessageDialog md = new MessageDialog(messageBoxText, caption);
                MessageBoxResult result = MessageBoxResult.None;
                if (button.HasFlag(MessageBoxButton.OK)) {
                    md.Commands.Add(new UICommand("OK", 
                        new UICommandInvokedHandler((cmd) => result = MessageBoxResult.OK)));
                }
                if (button.HasFlag(MessageBoxButton.Yes)) {
                    md.Commands.Add(new UICommand("Yes", 
                        new UICommandInvokedHandler((cmd) => result = MessageBoxResult.Yes)));
                }
                if (button.HasFlag(MessageBoxButton.No)) {
                    md.Commands.Add(new UICommand("No", 
                        new UICommandInvokedHandler((cmd) => result = MessageBoxResult.No)));
                }
                if (button.HasFlag(MessageBoxButton.Cancel)) {
                    md.Commands.Add(new UICommand("Cancel", 
                        new UICommandInvokedHandler((cmd) => result = MessageBoxResult.Cancel)));
                    md.CancelCommandIndex = (uint)md.Commands.Count - 1;
                }
                var op = await md.ShowAsync();
                return result;
            }
    
            public static async Task<MessageBoxResult> ShowAsync(string messageBoxText) {
                return await MessageBox.ShowAsync(messageBoxText, null, MessageBoxButton.OK);
            }
        }
    
        // Summary:
        //     Specifies the buttons to include when you display a message box.
        [Flags]
        public enum MessageBoxButton {
            // Summary:
            //     Displays only the OK button.
            OK = 1,
            // Summary:
            //     Displays only the Cancel button.
            Cancel = 2,
            //
            // Summary:
            //     Displays both the OK and Cancel buttons.
            OKCancel = OK | Cancel,
            // Summary:
            //     Displays only the OK button.
            Yes = 4,
            // Summary:
            //     Displays only the Cancel button.
            No = 8,
            //
            // Summary:
            //     Displays both the OK and Cancel buttons.
            YesNo = Yes | No,
        }
    
        // Summary:
        //     Represents a user's response to a message box.
        public enum MessageBoxResult {
            // Summary:
            //     This value is not currently used.
            None = 0,
            //
            // Summary:
            //     The user clicked the OK button.
            OK = 1,
            //
            // Summary:
            //     The user clicked the Cancel button or pressed ESC.
            Cancel = 2,
            //
            // Summary:
            //     This value is not currently used.
            Yes = 6,
            //
            // Summary:
            //     This value is not currently used.
            No = 7,
        }
    }
    

    I have also added the 'Yes' and 'No' Buttons to the MessageBoxButton enum. This is something I was always missing in the Windows Phone API. Now you can not only use OK/Cancel but also Yes/No/Cancel.

    private async void Button3_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {
        var result = await MessageBox.ShowAsync("This is a MessageBox", "Title", 
                                                MessageBoxButton.YesNo | MessageBoxButton.Cancel);
        if (result == MessageBoxResult.Yes) {
            // do something    
        }
        if (result == MessageBoxResult.No) {
            // do something    
        }
        Button3.Content = result.ToString();
    }
    

    Download my sample project which contains all source code.

    Cheers,

    Fons

    Techdays 2012 Sessies

    0 Comments
    By Fons Sonnemans, 5-3-2012

    Ook dit jaar heb ik mogen spreken op het Techdays event van Microsoft dat op 16 en 17 februari in Den Haag gehouden is. Deze keer met 3 sessies waarvan er twee op Channel9 te bekijken zijn.

    Windows Phone applicaties ontwerpen en ontwikkelen met de Metro UI

    Metro UI is de design-interface waarop Microsoft onder andere Windows Phone 7 en Windows 8 heeft gebaseerd. Het is minimalistisch, clean en - zoals de naam al weggeeft - geïnspireerd op borden die veelal op metro-, treinstations en luchthavens te vinden zijn. In deze sessie leg ik uit hoe je Metro toepast om mooie applicaties te ontwikkelen. Hierbij maak ik gebruik van Silverlight, Visual Studio, Expression Blend, Expression Design en de Silverlight Toolkit. Aan de hand van een aantal praktijkvoorbeelden uit bestaande applicaties demonstreer ik wat niet correct is en hoe dit op te lossen is. Hierbij worden o.a. onderwerpen besproken als vormgeving, animatie en navigatie.

    Download Presentatie en Voorbeeld Code.

    Windows Phone applicaties omzetten naar Windows 8

    In deze sessie wordt een Windows Phone applicatie, die opgezet is volgens het MVVM patroon, omgezet naar Windows 8. Hierbij komen de verschillen in XAML, DataBinding, Animaties en Networking aan de orde. Ook wordt ingegaan op wat dit betekend voor de Touch bediening, Navigatie en Layout. Deze sessie zal voor een groot gedeelte bestaan uit demo’s waarbij de applicatie live omgezet wordt.

    Download Presentatie en Voorbeeld Code.

    Stand Up Windows Phone Development (GeekNight)

    Deze sessie is anders dan wat u gewend bent. Geen slides, geen agenda maar live on stage ontwikkelen. In deze sessie ga ik een aan de hand van de input van de aanwezigen een windows phone applicatie maken, u roept wij bouwen. De app zal natuurlijk ontwikkeld worden met Visual Studio en Expression Blend. Wat het wordt is dus nu nog niet bekend, leerzaam en leuk wordt het zeker!

    Download Voorbeeld Code.

    Helaas zijn er zijn geen videos van de Geeknight sessies.

    Cheers,

    Fons

    Bloq for Windows Phone 7

    0 Comments
    By Fons Sonnemans, 12-6-2011

    In this very addictive game you have to select 4 bloqs of the same color to make a rectangle. The number of bloqs in this rectangle are added to your score. Win bonus time if a numbered bloq is in this rectangle.

    Features:

    • Fun, good looking and addictive
    • Local and online highscores (overall, daily and weekly)
    • Choose your favorite color theme
    • Choose small or large bloqs
      • Download

        You can download it for free from the WP7 Marketplace.

        Screenshots

        Cheers,

        Fons

    DevDays 2011 Sessies

    0 Comments
    By Fons Sonnemans, 9-5-2011

    Ook dit jaar heb ik mogen spreken op het DevDays event van Microsoft dat op 28 en 29 april in Den Haag gehouden is. Deze keer met 3 sessies waarvan er twee op Channel9 te bekijken zijn. Helaas is mijn 'Windows Phone Marketplace' sessie van de Geeknight niet gepubliceerd.

    Overzicht van Silverlight voor Windows Phone Toolkit

    Microsoft heeft met het uitbrengen van de Silverlight Toolkit een aantal extra componenten uitgebracht voor het ontwikkelen van de Windows Phone applicaties. In deze sessie zie je wat de mogelijkheden van deze componenten zijn. De AutoCompleteBox, ListPicker, LongListSelector, DatePicker, TimePicker, ToggleSwitch en WrapPanel controls zie je ingezet worden voor mooiere applicaties. De services zie je toegepast worden voor gestures, context menu en pagina transities.

    Download Presentatie en Code voorbeelden.

    Designing Windows Phone Applications met Expression Blend

    In deze sessie zie je hoe Microsoft Expression Blend gebruikt kan worden voor het ontwerpen van Windows Phone applicaties. De ApplicationBar-, Panorama- en Pivot controls zie je toegepast worden en zie je hoe je in Blend animaties, styling en de Visual State Manager kunt inzetten. Je leert hoe je Behaviors gebruikt om logica te implementeren zonder te programmeren. En tot slot zie je hoe je Sample Data en Data Binding gebruikt.

    Download Presentatie.

    Windows Phone Marketplace

    Applicaties en games worden via de Windows Phone Marketplace gedistribueerd. In deze sessie zie je wat je moet doen om je eigen applicaties en games in de Marketplace te krijgen en eventueel er ook nog geld aan te verdienen. Je ziet de stappen voor registratie en applicatie upload. Je ziet aan welke eisen een applicatie moet voldoen, maar ook de tips en tricks om zo veel mogelijk downloads te genereren. Ook zie je hoe je de IRS formulieren kunt invullen zodat je niet te veel belasting betaalt.

    Download Presentatie en Tiles Template voor Expression Design.

    Cheers,

    Fons

    TechDays 2011 WP7 app

    0 Comments
    By Fons Sonnemans, 4-4-2011

    I have written a new WP7 application which is now available on the Marketplace.

    TechDays

    Description

    TechDays 2011 for Windows Phone delivers users scheduling and speakers information from Microsoft TechNet_Live, DevDays and GeekNight. It will be held on 26 - 29 April in the World Forum, The Hague, The Netherlands.

    This is an unofficial app developed by Fons Sonnemans (Reflection IT). Visit his DevDays sessions and learn how it was developed.

    Download

    You can download it for free from the Windows Phone marketplace.

    Cheers,

    Fons

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